Books on Corporations and Health, 2007

With thousands of new books published each year, it’s hard to find titles of interest. To help readers sort through the piles, we present an idiosyncratic list of 10 books published in 2007 (or early 2008) that address the relationships among corporations, markets, government and health. These books may help Corporations and Health Watch readers to understand better the impact of corporate practices on health, to occupy cold winter nights, or to pick a gift for a deserving friend. We invite you to submit titles of other books you suggest, limiting titles to those published in 2007.


Ten Titles on Corporations and Health

Benjamin R. Barber. Consumed How Markets Corrupt Children, Infantilize adults, and Swallow Citizens Whole. W.W. Norton and Company, New York, 2007. Political theorist argues over-production of goods forces markets to infantilize consumers and undermine democracy.

Allan M. Brandt. The Cigarette Century The Rise, Fall and Deadly Persistence of the Product that Defined America. Basic Books, New York, 2007. Medical historian analyzes impact of tobacco industry on US and global health and politics.

Jillian Clare Cohen, Patricia Illingworth , & Udo Schuklenk, editors. The Power of Pills: Social, Ethical and Legal Issues in Drug Development, Marketing and Pricing. Pluto Press, London, England, 2007. Three academics edited this interdisciplinary collection of essays that analyze and critique the global pharmaceutical industry.

Philip J. Cook. Paying the Tab The Costs and Benefits of Alcohols Control. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 2007. Economist analyzes US alcohol policy and suggests increasing taxes to reduce harm.

Devra Davis. The Secret History of the War on Cancer. New York, Basic Books, 2007. Toxicologist describes how industry shapes US response to cancer at expense of prevention.

Richard Feldman. Ricochet Confessions of a Gun Lobbyist. Hoboken, N.J., John Wiley and Son, 2008. Former NRA lobbyist describes how group “betrays trust” of gun supporters.

David Harsanyi. Nanny State: How Food Fascists, Teetotaling Do-Gooders, Priggish Moralists, and other Boneheaded Bureaucrats Are Turning America into a Nation of Children. Broadway, New York, 2007. Libertarian columnist for the Denver Post rants against government interference on health.

Tim McCarthy. Auto Mania Cars, Consumers and the Environment. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, 2007. Historian describes how auto industry transformed United States in the twentieth century.

Michael Pollan. In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto. Penguin, New York, 2008. Food journalist suggests actions that individuals, communities and policy makers can take to reclaim food from industrial producers.

Robert B. Reich. Supercapitalism. The Transformation of Business, Democracy, and Everyday Life. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2007. Policy analyst and former Clinton Labor Secretary argues that new global competitive pressures force business to serve investors and consumers at expense of society and suggests public policies to restore democratic control of markets.